• 30
    March
    2017

    DISABILITY TRAINING FOR ATHABASCA PROFESSIONALS

    As mentioned in a previous blog post, a two-day professional training took place in Stony Rapids on March 7th and 8th. Professionals from all three ADCFS offices (Fond du Lac, Black Lake, Hatchet Lake) joined colleagues from the ADCFS Group Home and teachers from the Father Porte Memorial Denesulin...

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  • 24
    February
    2017

    Sharing Research Results at the Fond du Lac Family Conference

    The last two months of the Athabasca Community Research Partnership are dedicated to sharing project results and responding to the needs voiced by participants. From February 10th - 12th  the annual Family Conference was held at the Community Hall in Fond du Lac.  Over 250 community members parti...

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  • 31
    January
    2017

    Responding to the needs: Suicide and Self-harm February Training

    Suicide and self-harm in First Nations communities is a very sad experience.  Those we work with have been discussing ways to prevent and support client’s, families and communities as they deal with self-harm and suicide. The SFNFCI realizes that awareness and training are one way to assist the ...

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  • 31
    January
    2017

    Case Management Systems Presentation: Building Blocks to Success

    SFNFCI hosted a member meeting on Jan. 18, 2017 in Saskatoon on Case Management Systems.  Twelve agencies and one group home attended the session to learn more about information management and case management.  The 55 people in attendance includes staff from finance, technical, front line, prevent...

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  • 27
    January
    2017

    Hatchet Lake: Last Stop on Data Collection Tour of Athabasca

    The community-based project on special needs - the Athabasca Community Research Partnership, is nearing completion.  This past month, researcher Raissa Graumans travelled to Wollaston Lake to meet with families, professionals and community members of the Hatchet Lake First Nation.         ...

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  • 09
    December
    2016

    Art as a tool to engage clients

    The SFNFCI hosted a one day Art Therapy session on Nov. 30, 2016 for 24 Child & Family Services  Prevention staff.  The day long workshop included training from two art therapist: Felicitas Drobig and David Baudemont and traditional beading by Elder Maria Linklater.  Each participant received a ...

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  • 29
    November
    2016

    Prevention Core Training Development Begins

    The Prevention working group is working with the SFNFCI to develop core training for Prevention staff.  In the past year the SFNFCI has provided requested training in many areas that were considered critical to working in our First Nations communities.    These areas include:  communication, do...

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  • 28
    November
    2016

    Research in Athabasca Continues, this Month: Fond Du Lac!

    Fond du Lac is one of the oldest and most northern remote communities in Saskatchewan.  As one of the sites of the Athabasca Community Research Partnership, researcher Raissa travelled to Fond du Lac this month, to meet with professionals and community members. She held interviews at the Nursin...

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  • 18
    November
    2016

    Extra, Extra! Read all about it!!! 9th SDM supervisors Working Group

    The SDM’s Ninth Supervisors Working Group is coming up on December 1st and 2nd, 2016. Facilitated by invited guest Peggy Cordero, Senior Program Specialist, from NCCD Children’s Research Center. The two days will be spent reviewing and strengthening our understanding and use of SDM in the supe...

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  • 04
    November
    2016

    SFNFCI presents and publishes at the 8th Biennial PCWC Symposium

    On Oct. 25-28, 2016 three staff from SFNFCI attended and presented at the Imagining Child Welfare: In the Spirit of Reconciliation, Prairie Child Welfare Symposium in Winnipeg.    Shelley Thomas Prokop presented on Processes in Professional Development Working for First Nation Child and Family Ag...

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